drafty mountain hut

always at home, forever on the way

Month: January, 2013

31 January 1854

by layman k

We too have our thaws. They come to our January moods, when our ice cracks, and our sluices break loose. Thought that was frozen up under sternexperi- ence gushes forth in feeling and expression. There is a freshet which carries away dams of accumulated ice. Our thoughts hide unexpressed, like the buds under their downy or resinous scales;they would hardly keep a partridge from starving. If you would know what are my winter thoughts look for them in the partridge’s crop. They are like the laurel buds, – some leaf, some blossom buds, — which, though food for such indigenous creatures, will not expand into leaves and flowers until summer comes.

” Et primitus oritur herba imbribus primoribus evocata,” says Varro.

-from the journals of Henry David Thoreau

30 January 1859

by layman k

Jan. 30. How peculiar the hooting of an owl! It  is not shrill and sharp like the scream of a hawk, but full, round, and sonorous, waking the echoes of the  wood.

The surface of the snow, especially on hillsides, has a peculiarly combed or worn appearance where water has run in a thaw; i. e., the whole surface shows regular furrows at a distance, as if it had been scraped with an immense comb.

 

-from the journals of Henry David Thoreau

29 January 1856

by layman k

It is interesting to see near the sources, even of small streams or brooks, which now flow through an open country, perhaps shrunken in their volume, the traces of ancient mills, which have devoured the primitive forest, the earthen dams and old sluiceways, and ditches and banks for obtaining a supply of water. These relies of a more primitive period are still frequent in our midst. Such, too, probably, has been the history of the most thickly settled and cleared countries of Europe. The saw-miller is neighbor and successor to the Indian.

It is observable that not only the moose and the wolf disappear before the civilized man, but even many species of insects, such as the black fly and the almost microscopic “no-see-em”. How imperfect a notion have we commonly of what was the actual condition of the place where we dwell, three centuries ago!

from the journals of Henry David Thoreau

How to get ones living honestly

by layman k

Reading today’s entry from Thoreau’s Journal I found the following passage particularly striking. Especially with times being what they are:

In those days when how to get my living honestly, with freedom left for my proper pursuits, was a ques- tion which vexed me even more than it does now, I used to see a large box by the railroad, by three wide, in which the workmen six feet.long locked up their

tools at night; and it suggested to me that everyman who was hard pushed inight get him such a one for a dollar, and, having bored a few auger-holes in it, to admit the air at least, get into it when it rained and at night, and shut the lid and hook it, and so have freedom in his mind, and in his soul be free. This did not seem the worst alternative, nor by any means a despicable resource. You could sit up as late as you pleased; and, whenever you got up in the morning, you would not have any creditor dogging you for rent. I should not be in a bad box. Many a man is harassed to death to pay the rent of a larger and more luxurious box, who would not have frozen to death in such a box as this. I should not be in so bad a box as many a man is in now .’

If you mean by hard times, times, not when there is no bread, but when there is no cake, I have no sym- pathy with, you.

Economy is a subject that admits of being treated with levity, but it is not a subject that can be so dis- posed of.’

from the journals of Henry David Thoreau

28 January 1852

by layman k

Our life should be so active and progressive as to be a journey. Our meals should all be of journey-cake and hasty pudding. We should be more alert, see the sun rise, not keep fashionable hours, enter a house, our own house, as a khan, a caravansary. At noon I did not dine; I ate my journey-cake. I quenched my thirst at a spring or a brook. As I sat at the table, the hospitality was so perfect and the repast so sumptuous that. I seemed to be breaking my fast upon a bank in the midst of an arduous journey, that the water seemed to be a living spring, the napkins grass, the conversation free as the winds ; and the servants that waited on its were our simple desires.

from the journals of Henry David Thoreau

by layman k

enso

26 January 1858

by layman k

Nature loves gradation. Trees do not spring abruptly from the earth. Mosses creep up over the insteps of the trees and endeavor to reclaim them. Hence the propriety of lacing over the instep.

Is not the moccasin a more picturesque and fitter sort of shoe than ours in which to move amid the herbage ?

 from the journals of Henry David Thoreau

25 January 1860

by layman k

Jan.25. In keeping a journal of one’s walks and thoughts it seems to be worth the while to record those phenomena which are most interesting to us at the time. Such is the weather. It makes a material difference whether it is foul or fair, affecting surely our mood and thoughts.

– from the journals of Henry David Thoreau

24 January 1856 (con’t)

by layman k

Reading the hymns of the Rig Veda, translated by Wilson, which consist in a great measure of simple epithets addressed to the firmament, or the dawn, or  the winds, which mean more or less as the reader is more or less alert and imaginative, and seeing how widely the various translators have differed, they regarding not the poetry, but the history and philology, dealing with very concise Sanscrit, which must almost always be amplified to be understood, I am sometimes inclined to doubt if the translator has not made something out of nothing, – whether a real idea or sentiment has been thus transmitted to us from so primitive a period. I doubt if learned Germans might not thus edit pebbles from the seashore into hymns of the Rig Veda, and translators translate them accordingly, extracting the meaning which the sea has imparted to them in very primitive times. While the commentators and translators are disputing about the meaning of this word or that, I hear only the resounding of the ancient sera and put into it all the meaning I am possessed of, the deepest murmurs I can recall, for I do not the least care where I get my ideas, or what suggests them.

from the journals of Henry David Thoreau

24 January 1856

by layman k

Jan. 24.  A journal is a record of experiences and growth, not a preserve of things well done or said. I am occasionally reminded of a statement which I have made in conversation and immediately forgotten, which would read much better than what I put in my journal. It is a ripe, dry fruit of long-past experience which falls from me easily, without giving pain or pleasure. The charm of the journal must consist in a certain greenness, though freshness, and not in maturity. Here I cannot afford to be remembering what I said or did, my scurf cast off, but what I am and aspire to become.

– from the journals of Henry David Thoreau